Shauna Gerke and Chris Clark

Shauna Gerke and Chris Clark

Last year, Americans spent $11.6 billion dollars on movie tickets — nearly half of that  was spent during the summer “blockbusters” movie season.  Do you think summer blockbusters are worth the hype?  Press Manager Chris Clark and Front Office Manger Shauna Gerke debate.

Gerke: Summer movies too costly, too crowded

Did you see the new “Avengers” movie?  Or are you eagerly anticipating the “Child's Play” reboot, “Toy Story 4” or any of the other summer blockbusters?  I am not.  I would take a good book over a “blockbuster” movie any day.  The cost and too many people are the biggest reasons I don’t like to going to the movies. Throw in the mostly over hyped films, and it leaves me pining for my e-reader and a comfy chair.

In 2018, $4.1 billion was spent on movies during the summer movie season according to boxofficemojo.com. Are those summer blockbusters really worth nearly half of the 2018 total spent?  I just don’t think so. 

I also don’t get the appeal of going to a theatre.  According to the Hollywood Reporter, the average movie ticket hit an all-time high of $9.11 in 2018.  That is up from $8.97 in 2017.  Add to that the cost for alcoholic drinks and full meals served in some theaters, and you’ve got a pricey night on your hands. 

Another aspect to catching those over hyped blockbuster movies in a theatre is the number of people you have to contend with.  I’m sure you’ve gathered over time how quirky I can be, and I do not like crowds at all, so this point probably doesn’t surprise anyone.  So, when you consider that $4.1 billion divided by the $9.11 average ticket price equals more than 452 million people going to the movies each summer. That is way too many people to deal with.  Divide that number by the four \months the season is defined as by Box Office Mojo, that is more than 26 million people going to the movies every day.  I realize those 26 million people are spread across the country, but that’s still too many people in one place for me.

Hyping movies as summer blockbusters and not spreading those movies around the seasons seems a bit overdone to me.  If you enjoy going out to the theatre and catching those expensive movies with the crowds, be my guest.  You just won’t run in to me there.

Clark: Bring on the blockbusters

If your a movie-goer this is a great time of the year. Some of the best movies come out this summer. I’m not saying that good movies don't come out the rest of the year, but they usually save the best for the summer months.

I’m not really sure why but that seems to be the trend, and, frankly, I like it. It allows more time for the whole family to go see them since there is less to do with schools not being in session and such.

I did a little looking on the internet, which said it was something to do with greater viewing in the summer month,s hence way the more anticipated movies come out during the summer.

I prefer the summer releases over the winter because it's more convenient to go as a family and the roads are usually in better condition. Unfortunately, I think I’m one of the few people that have yet made it to see the “Avengers End Game,” but that will be happening soon.

We also use these great releases in the summer as incentive for the kids. If they behave and do what they are supposed to do without fuss, we will usually reward them with a trip to one of the movies that are coming out during the summer. If they released all the good movies before the summer hype, then we wouldn’t be able to have that extra little incentive.

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